Self-Sustainability

The Paramount Importance of Parents in Islam

In Islam, the importance of parents transcends mere biological ties; it encompasses spiritual, emotional, and societal dimensions. Parents are revered as the embodiment of selfless love, nurturing care, and unwavering support. Their roles as educators, caregivers, and spiritual guides are indispensable to the fabric of Muslim society. Therefore, honoring and respecting parents is not only a religious obligation but also a fundamental principle that fosters harmony, compassion, and righteousness within families and communities.

Supplementing Universal Basic Income with Small Business Development and Energy Self-Sufficiency.

Universal basic income (UBI) is a policy proposal that would provide a regular, unconditional cash payment to all members of a society. While UBI has been advocated by some as a way to address the challenges posed by automation and the changing nature of work, it is currently not feasible to implement on a widespread basis in most countries. There are a number of logistical and financial challenges that would need to be overcome in order to implement UBI in a way that is sustainable and equitable.

However, despite the current challenges to implementing UBI, it is becoming increasingly clear that it will be critical in the coming years to find ways to support individuals and communities as the economy and job market continue to evolve. With this in mind, governments should consider advocating for and supporting initiatives that aim to establish and strengthen small, ethical artisan businesses (SEABs) and farms (SEAFs) in their communities.

These types of businesses can provide job opportunities and support local economies, and can also help to strengthen the food supply and promote self-sufficiency. Adding “gigs” or short-term, project-based work to support SEABs and SEAFs can also help to create more flexible and diverse sources of income for individuals.

In addition, governments can consider supporting the development of interoperable small scale residential energy production systems, which could help to reduce reliance on fossil fuels and increase the self-sufficiency of communities. Gamification and the use of decentralized autonomous organizations (DAOs) to govern communities can also be explored as potential ways to engage citizens and encourage participation in local economic development.

While UBI remains currently impossible, there are steps that governments and communities can take to create more resilient and sustainable local economies that can provide income and support for citizens in the coming years.

In summary, universal basic income (UBI) may be a desirable policy for addressing the challenges posed by automation and the changing nature of work, but it is currently not feasible to implement on a widespread basis. However, there are other strategies that governments and communities can consider to create more resilient and sustainable local economies that can provide income and support for citizens in the coming years.

One such strategy is the establishment and support of small, ethical artisan businesses (SEABs) and farms (SEAFs). These types of businesses can provide job opportunities and support local economies, and can also help to strengthen the food supply and promote self-sufficiency. Adding “gigs” or short-term, project-based work to support SEABs and SEAFs can also create more flexible and diverse sources of income for individuals.

In addition, governments can consider supporting the development of interoperable small scale residential energy production systems, which can help to reduce reliance on fossil fuels and increase the self-sufficiency of communities. Gamification and the use of decentralized autonomous organizations (DAOs) to govern communities can also be explored as potential ways to engage citizens and encourage participation in local economic development.

Overall, while UBI may not be currently possible, there are steps that governments and communities can take to create more resilient and sustainable local economies that can provide income and support for citizens.

From Globalization to Interplanetary Decentralization: A Roadmap for the Future of Governance

As we stand at the threshold of a new era, it is important to reflect on the lessons of the past. Throughout human history, we have witnessed pain, despair, and horror in the pursuit of social, economic, and scientific evolution.

But now, we have the opportunity to be the seed of the universe. From what we can prove, there is nothing else out there – just a vast expanse of space and a few rocks that may one day be able to support life. In a billion years, the inhabitants of other planets could be descendants of Earth.

Yet, despite this incredible potential, we continue to fight wars, exploit the weak, and turn a blind eye to the suffering of the homeless and hungry. Perhaps it all means nothing in the grand scheme of things. Or perhaps it means everything.

We believe it is time to put an end to this cycle of violence and suffering. It is time to focus on the future – the future of humanity. And that future, we believe, lies in interplanetary decentralization.

Join us as we explore this exciting new frontier in our upcoming white paper, where we will delve into the potential of decentralization for improving national security, citizen data security, and collaboration between governments and citizens. We will also examine the role of quantum-resistant cryptography, the development and deployment of space drone network nodes, and the separation of governance and financial networks.

Most importantly, we will make the case for collapsing the business technology hierarchy in order to achieve efficiency and innovation. This is the future we believe in, and we hope you will join us in making it a reality.

A Paper outline written from conversations between the Int3rPlanetary Technology Office and chatGPT:

Introduction:

Decentralization is the future of governance and communication, and space-based decentralization is the next frontier. In this paper, we propose the establishment of a network of space-based decentralization nodes to support interplanetary communication and governance. We argue that this network is necessary for the protection of citizen data, the enhancement of national security, and the promotion of collaboration between citizens and government. The current state of globalization has its limitations, and it is time for a shift towards interplanetary decentralization. This paper discusses the implementation of such a system, including the role of quantum-resistant cryptography and the development and deployment of space drone network nodes. We also examine the role of BZDO in the implementation and maintenance of decentralization and the case for collapsing the business technology hierarchy. We hope to inspire governments and industry to adopt and support decentralization efforts as we work towards a brighter future for humanity.

Background:

Globalization has brought significant advances in technology and communication, but it has also created vulnerabilities and inequalities. Data breaches and cyber attacks have become more common, and the centralization of power and resources has led to a lack of transparency and accountability in government and business. Interplanetary decentralization offers a solution to these issues by distributing power and resources across a network of nodes, rather than relying on a centralized system.

Objectives:

The main objective of this paper is to explore the potential benefits and challenges of interplanetary decentralization, and to provide a roadmap for implementing this new paradigm. Specifically, we will aim to:

  • Define interplanetary decentralization and its potential advantages for national security, citizen data and voting security, and collaboration between government and citizens.
  • Outline the steps necessary for implementing interplanetary decentralization, including the use of quantum-resistant cryptography and the deployment of a network of space drone nodes.
  • Discuss the role of the BZDO framework in interplanetary decentralization and its importance for a full-stack technology architect core.
  • Conclude with a call to action for governments, citizens, and industry to adopt and support decentralization efforts.

Caring for Ducklings

Brooding
Ducklings can be effectively raised in any chicken brooder house and under any chicken brooder design. Ducklings are typically easier to raise than chickens. Although Muscovy ducks can be used to raise ducklings, they are more valuable for egg production or incubation and should not be wasted for this reason. Discourage broodiness by placing broody ducks in broody coops for 3–5 days, ensuring that they have access to food and water at all times.

Brooder home

The brooder housing should be sufficiently ventilated, but drafts that produce chills should be avoided. Wall apertures positioned 1,2 meters from the floor allow adequate ventilation.

It is possible to raise ducklings on wire, litter, or a combination of the two. The floor should ideally be concrete, with 8 cm of trash. Moldy litter can cause ducklings to perish, so always keep the litter dry. Periodically, mix the litter.

Ducklings require little floor space. For ducklings up to 10 days old, 200 cm2/bird (or 50 birds/m2) is recommended. Due to their rapid growth, this space will need to be 1,250 cm2/bird (8 birds/m2) by the time the ducklings are 8 weeks old.

Controlled-environment housing is good for brooding ducks and can be utilized for the first two weeks of a duckling’s life before being transferred to an adjacent growing house.

Brooder

Regardless of the type of brooder — gas, electricity, hot water, or hot air — it must provide adequate heat, ventilation, and space to prevent congestion. As a general rule, half the indicated chick capacity of a brooder can be used to raise ducklings.

Place surrounds around hover brooders, moving them further away from the brooder each day, and remove them after the first week.

For the first week, the temperature in the incubator should be 30 degrees Celsius. Reduce this by 3°C per week until the third week, at which point the heat can be eliminated (depending on the weather).

10 days after hatching, ducklings may be allowed access to outdoor runs. Keep in mind that ducklings hatched in captivity cannot withstand rain until they have sufficient feathers, around 3–4 weeks of age. Protect the ducklings against rats and foxes as well as other predators.

Waterers and feeders

Ducklings must always have access to clean, potable water. For the first few days, this can be provided by 4.5 L drinking fonts, and later preferably by an automatic ballcock-operated drinking vessel or a bell-shaped hanging drinker. Ducklings should be let to submerge their heads in water, but not to swim in it. Place drinkware on a wire grid over the concrete floor to prevent wet litter.

Even brief times without water are fatal for ducklings. Stumbling and seizures are classic signs of dehydration. Give ducklings a drink of warm milk before supplying them with water if the water source fails; this will prevent intestinal cramps and staggers.

Placing feeders on a raised platform will prevent contamination from droppings. Both food and water must be readily available. For each duckling up to three weeks of age, allow 1.5 cm of room for drinking and 4 cm of space for feeding.

Rearing

After hatching, ducklings may be placed in intensive, semi-intensive, or wire colony cages. Or, if the management system justifies it, ducklings may be raised in the brooder house with the heat turned off until the time of sale.

Wire roosting cages

If ducklings are raised in wire colony cages, no more than 10 ducklings per standard pen (1.25 m 1.0 m; 8 birds/m2 or 1250 cm2/bird) should be allowed. In general, ducklings kept in wire cages are more marketable than those grown on the ground, mostly because they are confined and so do not “ran off” meat.

Ground stance

Ground rearing is favored by producers with ample land due to the cheaper housing expenses and simpler flock management. Allow 1250 cm2 of floor area per growing duck up to 8 weeks of age in intensive housing. Those housed semi-intensively require the same amount of area (8 birds per square meter).

For optimal results, ducklings should be raised in groups no larger than 500. A shed with a skillion roof is suitable. Concrete flooring are the cleanest. During windy and rainy weather, cover the front of the shed with polyweave plastic or hessian shades.

Separate the outdoor enclosures with 60 cm-tall fencing, and give each duckling a 2 m2 space. Lock ducklings inside the shed at night.

Utilize one 15-watt bulb per 18 m2 of floor space for all-night lighting to enhance productivity. Ideally, ducks should be raised on wood shavings in dense buildings. If wood shavings are unavailable, straw can be used daily in the summer and, if necessary, twice daily in the winter.

Wet and moist trash must be removed from the shed. As ducks are extremely susceptible to heat stress, outdoor shade is required.

Swimming water may be supplied, although it is not required. If ducks are permitted to swim and play in clean, moving water, their growth rate and feathering will be enhanced. While there is a gain in performance, the vast quantities of water need and the associated expense are not justified.

Drinkers, feeders, and litter should be managed identically to how they were during the nesting time. However, ducklings require around 75 percent more area for drinking and eating (i.e. 3.5 cm drinking space and 7 cm feeding space). Growing ducks are suited for automatic feeding.

Cannibalism

Although cannibalism can occur at any age, it is more prevalent in ducklings older than four weeks. The fundamental causes of cannibalism in birds are unknown, however it is connected with boredom and exacerbated by:

  • overpopulation,
  • inadequate ventilation,
  • improper nutrition.

Transport and handling

Ducks can be transported:

  • by the crown of the head;
  • by holding both wings with a single hand;
  • by carrying them under one’s arm with the duck’s head facing backwards; or
  • using one wing and one leg from the same side.

Sometimes it is necessary to handle ducks, such as when weighing them or examining them for sickness. They must be captured and handled with minimal stress.

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